Lessons From The Landscape of History

In The Landscape of History: How Historians Map the Past, John Gaddis discusses the methods that historians use, comparing them to methods of sciences such as astronomy, paleontology, and geology. The book is a great exploration of different approaches to examining evidence.  Here are a few key lessons.

A library is better than a time machine
Unlike time travelers,  “historians have the capacity for selectivity, simultaneity, and the shifting of scale…”:
Selectivity:  Historians can select from the cacophony of events what they think is important.  They proactively impose significance on events, not the other way around.
Simultaneity they can be in several times and places at once.  By standing apart from events, historians can understand, and compare events. “…understanding implies comparison: to comprehend something is to see it in relation to other entities of the same class…”
Scale.  Historians can zoom in and out between macroscopic and microscopic levels of analysis.  As a result processes are visible to historians even if they weren’t visible to people of the age the historian studies(or a hypothetical time traveler).
Historians integrate induction and deduction
Since we’re historians, not novelists , we’re obliged to tier our narrative as closely as possible to the evidence that has survived: that’s an inductive process.  But we have no way of knowing, until we begin looking for evidence with the purposes of our narrative in mind, how much of its going to be relevant: that’s a deductive calculation. Composing the narrative will then produce places where more research is needed, and we’re back to induction again.  But that new evidence will still have to fit within the modified narrative so we’re back to deduction.  And so on until, as I earlier quoted William H. McNeill, “it feels right, and then I write it up and ship it off to the publisher.”  That’s why the distinction between induction and deduction is largely meaningless for the historian seeking to establish causation.  The verb “to fit” which implies both procedures, is much better.  Its not just tailors who look at what they have to cover, and then what they have with which to cover it, and then back and forth, again and again, until the fit is as good as its going to get.
The combination of induction and deduction is especially important in biography.
Biography, like the larger sphere of history within which it resides is at once a deductive and an inductive exercise.  Patterns of human behavior extending across time and space can alert us to the kinds of questions we should be asking about the particular individual we’re dealing with:  that’s where deduction comes in.
 …
But these patterns alone can’t determine the answers, for it’s all to easy to to find what you’re looking for when you’ve already decided a head of time what it is.  The evidence of particular experience in biography has got to discipline what we know from collective experience: induction is how we do that.
Historians must balance the general against the particular.
Interdependent Variables
Social science is obsessed with separating out independent and dependent variables. Historians along with many scientists working outside of laboratories  view variables as interdependent.  The author calls this an ecological approach, rather than a reductionist approach.
 
Theories like relativity, plate tectonics, and natural selection emphasize relationships among variables, some of them continuous and others contingent.  Regularity and randomness coexist within such theories: they allow for punctuations that upset equilibria such as asteroid impacts, earthquakes, or the outbreak of new and lethal diseases.  Nor do they require singling out certain variables as more important than others.Nor do they require singling out certain variables as more important than others: what would the independent variables be for the Andromeda galaxy or the Norwegian coastline, or the Darwin finch? Reductionism in these realms is only a stepping stone towards synthesis.
Historians,however, reject the doctrine of immaculate causation, which seems to be implied in the idea that one can identify, without reference to all that has preceded it, such a thing as an independent variable.  Causes always have antecedents.  We may rank their relative significance, but we’d think it irresponsible to seek to isolate or “tease out” single causes for complex events.  We see history as proceeding instead from multiple causes and their intersections.  Interconnections matter more to us than does the enshrinement of particular variables.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s